When Online and Offline Environments Meet

Auditory and Visual Environmental Factors, Privacy Concerns, and Self-Disclosure in Video Consultations

Authors

  • Nadine Bol Tilburg Center for Cognition and Communication (TiCC), Department of Communication and Cognition, Tilburg University, the Netherlands https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6895-9512
  • Tatiana Gromova Tilburg Center for Cognition and Communication (TiCC), Department of Communication and Cognition, Tilburg University, the Netherlands https://orcid.org/0009-0006-6864-5843
  • Kim Tenfelde Tilburg Center for Cognition and Communication (TiCC), Department of Communication and Cognition, Tilburg University, the Netherlands
  • Marjolijn L. Antheunis Tilburg Center for Cognition and Communication (TiCC), Department of Communication and Cognition, Tilburg University, the Netherlands https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7611-742X

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47368/ejhc.2024.104

Keywords:

video consultations, environmental factors, privacy concerns, self-disclosure

Abstract

Theory of situational privacy and self-disclosure posits that perceived levels of privacy are determined by perceptions of the environment, and that certain levels of privacy are necessary for self-disclosure. In video consultations, auditory and visual aspects of the doctor’s environment can cause patients to experience more or less privacy. To provide empirical evidence for these theoretical assumptions, we conducted a 2 (auditory environmental factor: doctor wearing headphones vs. not) by 2 (visual environmental factor: doctor showing the entire office vs. not) between-subjects scenario-based experiment (N = 163). Participants imagined themselves in a video consultation with a doctor and reported their information and territory privacy concerns and willingness to disclose to the doctor. Results showed that the ability to see the doctor’s entire office led to lower information privacy concerns, which – in turn – were associated with increased willingness to disclose medical information to a doctor. Wearing headphones by the doctor did not affect privacy concerns and self-disclosure. Manipulations of both the auditory and visual environment were not significantly associated with territory privacy concerns. These results provide direction for further research on environmental factors and their impact on patients’ privacy concerns and self-disclosure during medical video communications.

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Published

13.05.2024

How to Cite

Bol, N., Gromova, T., Tenfelde, K., & Antheunis, M. L. (2024). When Online and Offline Environments Meet: Auditory and Visual Environmental Factors, Privacy Concerns, and Self-Disclosure in Video Consultations. European Journal of Health Communication, 5(1), 67–88. https://doi.org/10.47368/ejhc.2024.104

Issue

Section

Original Research Paper